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Publications

AUTHOR/S

Richard Koeck

Inhabiting The Image of the City

Prof Koeck has been commissioned by Routledge to produce the monograph "Inhabiting the Image of the City: interspatial encounters between architecture, people and image" due to be published in 2018.

When we ask what makes a city, practicing architects, engineers and planners tend to think of the built environment as a physical construct; a quantifiable organization of space, or as a network of buildings and spaces in which people reside and whose voids they inhabit. Other city experts, such as urban sociologists and economists, tend to see cities as a place in which strangers meet, communication and transactions happen, ideas are formed, and money is exchanged (e.g. Arendt; Habermas; Jacobs; Sennett). But how do people see and make sense of the city when they do not belong to such an expert group? The term image in the title of this book is used in its multiple dimensions; that is, as in the representational image itself, but also as in the image that is created in the context of placemaking-branding activities. The tensions that inhere in this multiplicity leads to a series of questions. What forms our perceived image of the city in everyday, ordinary urban life situations and practices?  In which ways does the image itself intersect with architecture and the city? Do we, in fact, inhabit the image of the city and, if so, how?

This is a book about urban theory, written from an architectural and (moving)-image-making perspective. It explores how we make sense of and shape the city, thereby linking historical perspectives of image taking, representation and consumption with present-day architectural, economic, and creative practices. It draws inspiration from Kevin Lynch’s Image of the City (1960), in the sense that it aims to radically change our perspective with which we see the city. It challenges our often static notion of the image (as physical and mental manifestation) and regards it as profoundly non-static, yet at the same time as the lowest common denominator in a complex system of architectural montage and dynamic place-making. All are concerns that will become particularly important as we move into a future in which virtual (VR) and augmented realities (AR) increasingly “merge” moving images with space and thus challenge our perception of architecture and the city.

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Film and Architecture

AUTHOR/S

Edited by Claire Mander, Dave Beech, Richard Cork, Sarah Kent

Sculpture Shock: Site Specific Interventions in Subterranean, Ambulatory and Historic Contexts

David Ogle’s work featured in: "Sculpture Shock: Site Specific Interventions in Subterranean, Ambulatory and Historic Contexts" published by The Royal British Society of Sculptors.

The book documents David Ogle’s (CAVA) work as part of The Royal British Society of Sculptors’ Sculpture Shock award (2013-2015) for temporary site-specific interventions. This project took sculpture out of the often-clinical confines of the gallery space and into non-traditional environments, with a view to reintegrating art into everyday life. The site-specific interventions took the form of installation, performance, socially engaged and object-based work in media as diverse as light, sound and text into unusual sites: subterranean (the unseen world beneath our city), ambulatory (without physical confines in movement through space and time) and historic (an illustrious building in London).

This richly illustrated publication is contextualised throughout by: Dave Beech, writer, curator and Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art; Richard Cork, British art historian, editor, critic and broadcaster; and Sarah Kent, former visual arts editor of Time Out and the ICA's Director of Exhibitions.

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Art Installation

AUTHOR/S

Edited by Francois Penz and Richard Koeck

Cinematic Urban Geographies

Cinematic Urban Geographies book explores many different facets of urban fragmentation through the medium of cinema and the moving image, as a contribution to our understanding of cities and their topographies. At the heart of this investigation is a concern for the filmic interpretation of maps, geographies, landmarks, topographies, and aerial photography amongst other things.

Cinematic Urban Geographies aims to explore the different ways in which cinema and the moving image contribute to our understanding of cities and their topographies. The worlds of maps, geographical studies and rigorous historical studies of cities – such as the Survey of London – are all part of what we would define as the ‘hard’ city: surveys of the urban landscape on the basis of physical evidence, which provides the necessary backbone to any serious urban investigation. Complementing this approach, we argue here that film provides remarkable evidence of the ‘soft’ side of the city, a term coined by Jonathan Raban (1974). ‘The city as we imagine it, […] soft city of illusion, myth, aspiration, and nightmare, is as real, maybe more real, than the hard city one can locate on maps, in statistics, in monographs on urban sociology and demography and architecture’.

In other words, if cinema stands for ‘the soft city of illusion’ which is as ‘real’ as the ‘hard’ city, what are the mechanisms through which this process is realised, and what does it tell us? And how might cinema provide the perceptual equipment to reveal the ‘hard side’ of the city also, and help us grasp the complexity of urban phenomena? What new methodological tools and approaches do we need to devise in order to tease out and elicit the encounter between the ‘hard’ and the ‘soft’ so that architects and planners as well as scholars can benefit from the insights gained?

The publication is forthcoming in 2015 with Palgrave MacMillan and will include contributions by Frederick Baker, Charlotte Brunsdon, Maurizio Cinquegrani, Richard Coyne, Ian Christie, Mathew Flintham, Michael Hrebeniak, Henry Keazor, Richard Koeck, Roland-François Lack, Chris Speed and Chris Barker, François Penz, Aileen Reid, Mark Shiel, Stavros Alifragkis and Giorgos Papakonstantinou, and Maureen Thomas.

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Film and Architecture

AUTHOR/S

Edited by Marco Iuliano and Francesca Serazzanetti

James Stirling. Inspiration and Process in Architecture

Drawing on original documentation - sketches, photographs and the iconic axonometrics - the book explores the creative process of James Stirling: from the early inspirations of Liverpool’s docks to his devotion to Le Corbusier, acknowledging the fundamental role of the partnerships with James Gowan and Michael Wilford. Described by his mentor Colin Rowe as an architectural connoisseur, Stirling analyses the past through relentless observational skills and elaborates it as a source of creativity and as a context to respect. The most eccentric British architect leaves a legacy that is not confined to history alone, but it continues to be paradigmatic for generations of architects to come.

Inspiration and Process in Architecture is a series of monographs on key figures in modern and contemporary architecture. It offers a reading of the practice of design which emphasises the value of freehand drawing as part of the creative process. Each volume provides a different perspective, revealing insights and showing the various observation techniques languages, characters, forms and means of communication.

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Film and Architecture

AUTHOR/S

Edited by Emily Gee and Jeremy Myers

Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life

Digital technologies are radically distrupting our working world. During the Industrial Revolution, workers fought for the right to a work-life blance in which they could perform their eight hours of labour and then leave the factory gates. Today’s information woker labours within a ‘factory’ whose gates never close and work is continuously, tantalising closely to hand. Founder of the eight-hour movement in the UK, Robert Owen, coined the famous idiom ‘Eight hours labour, eight hours recreation, eight hours rest’ in 1817. Nearly two centuries later, we have entered a restless, globalised dislocated working era, as the traditional model of the working day fades from view.

Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life presents a unique collection of essays, artworks and experimental design research projects which seek to critique this changing paradigm. Presented in three sections – Labour, Representation and Space – this book explores the cultural, artistic, economic and technological strands that make up our working world, and upon which contemporary artists and designers feel compelled to comment.

Richard Koeck's essay maps the cinematic history of "work environments" in film, giving insight into changing ideologies, architectures and spatial iconographies.

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Film and Architecture

AUTHOR/S

Edited Roger McKinley and Clara Casian

Rhythmanalysis

Rhythmanalysis is a collection of essays deriving form the CX Creative Exchange-funded research project with the same name. It contains contributions that the ambitious aim of discovering whether or not we actually have, or can have, a discernable rhythm in our daily lives and if, within it, there is a consistency to the point that psychologists call flow – a place of wellbeing, immersion and creativity.

This publication is a conclusion to the research project in which we have attempted to gather together some of our experiences, views, iterations and analysis. In this sense it is more a notebook or scrapbook of the project as it unfolded rather than a demonstration of robust methodology. Within the Rhythmanalysis team were academics from architecture and psychology, a designer, an artist and an expert in physiological data analysis all of whom contributed immensely to this truly transdisciplinary project and this this publication.  

Richard Koeck's essay maps the cinematic history of "work environments" in film, giving insight into changing ideologies, architectures and spatial iconographies.

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Film and Architecture

AUTHOR/S

Edited by Jonathan Harris and with Richard Koeck

Picasso and the Politics of Visual Representation

The essays of this book, published in by the Éditions de la Villette (Paris, 2013), are the proceedings of the 17th Rencontres de la Fondation Le Corbusier (Istanbul, Athens and Naples) for the centenary of Corbu’s voyage d’Orient in 1911.

Marco Iuliano contributed to the book with the article ‘Montage d’Orient’, a detailed analysis of a painting made by Le Corbusier in 1918, La Cheminée (The Fireplace): it is a representation of the Acropolis and of the Parthenon – that is considered by the architect to be his first painting. From 1918 until his old age, Le Corbusier used to paint every morning, before spending the afternoon in the architectural atelier. He clearly stated that the key to understand his architecture is his labour as a painter, referring especially at the creative process of the architectural composition. This paper, for the first time, overlaps the evidence seen on the painting with the written description of the temples on the Acropolis made by Le Corbusier in 1911 and only years later published. After a very attentive analysis, also with the aid of a reconstructive drawing, the small table of La Cheminée reveals itself as the assemblage of the architectural elements of the Acropolis and represents a key to the understanding of Le Corbusier’s mental structure, a direct link from the visual arts to architecture.

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Art and Modernity

AUTHOR/S

Contribution by Maro Iuliano

L’invention d’un architecte. Le voyage en Orient de Le Corbusier

The essays of this book, published in by the Éditions de la Villette (Paris, 2013), are the proceedings of the 17th Rencontres de la Fondation Le Corbusier (Istanbul, Athens and Naples) for the centenary of Corbu’s voyage d’Orient in 1911.

Marco Iuliano contributed to the book with the article ‘Montage d’Orient’, a detailed analysis of a painting made by Le Corbusier in 1918, La Cheminée (The Fireplace): it is a representation of the Acropolis and of the Parthenon – that is considered by the architect to be his first painting. From 1918 until his old age, Le Corbusier used to paint every morning, before spending the afternoon in the architectural atelier. He clearly stated that the key to understand his architecture is his labour as a painter, referring especially at the creative process of the architectural composition. This paper, for the first time, overlaps the evidence seen on the painting with the written description of the temples on the Acropolis made by Le Corbusier in 1911 and only years later published. After a very attentive analysis, also with the aid of a reconstructive drawing, the small table of La Cheminée reveals itself as the assemblage of the architectural elements of the Acropolis and represents a key to the understanding of Le Corbusier’s mental structure, a direct link from the visual arts to architecture.

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Art and Modernity

Author/s

Julia Hallam and Les Roberts

Locating the Moving Image: New Approaches to Film and Place

Locating the Moving Image reveals new perspectives on the relationship between space, place and cultures of the moving image. It is the first book to bring together the research methods used by the influential creators of ‘new’ cinema history that have evolved in recent years with emerging perspectives from multi-disciplinary researchers using Geographical Information Systems technologies to trace spatial patterns in film production and consumption. Leading scholars in this rapidly evolving inter-disciplinary field examine the social experience of cinema and the different ways in which film production developed spatially as a commercial enterprise, as a leisure activity, and as a mode of expression and communication. Their research charts new pathways in mapping the relationship between film production and local film practices, theatrical exhibition circuits and cinema going. Topics include cinematic practices in rural and urban communities, and the spatial development of film production and cinema going as social practices at local, regional and national levels.

Contributors include: Robert C. Allen, Jeffrey Klenotic, Daniel Bilteresyt, Philippe Meers, Deb Verhoeven, Colin Arrowsmith, Sébastian Caquard, Daniel Naud, Benjamin Wright, Elisa Ravazzoli, Julia Hallam, Ryan Shand, Kate Bowles.

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Spatial Anthropology

AUTHOR/S

Richard Koeck

Cine|Scapes: Cinematic Spaces in Architecture and Cities

Prof Richard Koeck’s new book is called Cine-Scapes (2012), in which he explores the relationship between urban space, architecture and the moving image. While an impressive amount of research has been done with regards to the way in which architecture is portrayed in film, this text offers a somewhat usual perspective. There is little doubt that film can ‘reflect’ a postmodern condition, however, what this book demonstrates is that the postmodern, architectural condition in which we live is begins to show signs of significant filmic and cinematic influences.

What happens if we begin to see the city as a place for an embodied visual consumption; a visual apparatus or, perhaps, a system that is based on movement, light and the body, and which we can explore in kinematic, kinetic, and kinaesthetic ways? How can we define a filmic significance and properties of architecture and urban environments?

Drawing on knowledge derived from architectural and film practice, this book offers insight into architecture and urban debates through the eyes of a practitioner working in both fields – filmmaking and architectural design. Using film as a lens through which we look at urban spaces and places, Prof Koeck reveals the filmic and cinematic phenomena that are present in urban landscapes, and which are perhaps otherwise disregarded or merely passively consumed.

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Film and Architecture

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Hazel Andrews and Les Roberts

Liminal Landscapes: Travel, Experience and Spaces In-between

Ideas and concepts of liminality have long shaped debates around the uses and practices of space in constructions of identity, particularly in relation to different forms of travel such as tourism, migration and pilgrimage, and the social, cultural and experiential landscapes associated with these and other mobilities. The ritual, performative and embodied geographies of borderzones, non-places, transitional spaces, or ‘spaces in-between’ are often discussed in terms of the liminal, yet there have been few attempts to problematize the concept, or to rethink how ideas of the liminal might find critical resonance with contemporary developments in the study of place, space and mobility.

Liminal Landscapes fills this void by bringing together variety of new and emerging methodological approaches of liminality from varying disciplines to explore new theoretical perspectives on mobility, space and socio-cultural experience. By doing so, it offers new insight into contemporary questions about technology, surveillance, power, the city, and post-industrial modernity within the context of tourism and mobility. Contributors include: Bjørn Thomassen, Emily Orley, Emma Cocker, Kevin Meethan, Piret Pungas, Ester Võsu, Ivan Constantino, Emma Fraser, Tom Selwyn, Simon Ward, Anita Howarth, Yasmin Ibrahim, Pietro Deandrea, David Crouch

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Spatial Anthropology

Ways We Work

recent Publications

Author/s

Les Roberts

Film, Mobility and Urban Space: a Cinematic Geography of Liverpool

Drawing on multi-disciplinary debates surrounding the cultural production of place, space and memory in the post-industrial city, Film, Mobility and Urban Space explores the role of moving images in representations and perceptions of everyday urban landscapes. The arguments put forward in the book are based on a case study of Liverpool in the north west of England and draw from a unique spatial database of over 1700 archive films of the city from 1897 to the present day. Theoretically wide-ranging in scope, Les Roberts’s study combines critical spatial analysis, archival research and qualitative methods to navigate a city’s cinematic geographies as mapped across a broad spectrum of film genres, including amateur film, travelogues, newsreels, promotional films, documentaries and features.

As the second most filmed city in the UK – and formerly second city of Empire – Liverpool boasts a rich industrial, architectural and maritime heritage that has positioned the city – which was European Capital of Culture in 2008 – at the forefront of current debates on regeneration, visuality and cultural memory. The tension between the city as spectacle and the city as archive, and the contradictions that underpin the growing ‘cinematization’ of postmodern urban space are at the core of the arguments developed throughout the book.

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Spatial Anthropology

AUTHOR/S

Richard Koeck and Les Roberts

The City and the Moving Image: Urban Projections

The City and the Moving Image: Urban Projections explores the relationship between urban space, architecture and the moving image. Drawing on a range of disciplinary approaches to film and moving image practices, the book brings together contributions from scholars and practitioners working in film and cultural studies, architecture and cultural geography.

The collection is organised around four main thematic sections, each of which explores the spatial and temporal underpinnings to debates on film and urban landscapes. The trope of ‘projection’, while playing on its more immediate cinematic connotations, is also intended to convey a wider set of meanings, addressing issues and debates relating to space, place and identity; landscape, memory and absence; cartography and mapping; and architecture and urban narrativity.

The contributions address a range of moving image genres, from features and documentaries, to amateur film, actualities and promotional films. Mapping the relationship between material, visual and embodied spaces of urban representation, the book explores new and critical perspectives on film and urban landscapes.

Contributors include: Heather Norris Nicholson, Isabelle McNeill, Ryan Shand, Julia Hallam, Charlotte Brunsdon, Tara McDowell, Ian Robinson, Alan Marcus, Teresa Castro, Paul Newland, Maurizio Cinquegrani, Robert Kronenburg, Francois Penz, Helmut Weihsmann.

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Film and Architecture

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